Free Resources Archive

  • March is Women’s History Month

    Women’s History Month, celebrated annually in March, is an opportunity to recognize women’s achievements and contributions to our nation’s history and culture. The origin of the observance can be traced to 1978, when the Sonoma County California Task Force on the Status of Women organized a celebration of Women’s History Week, designed to coincide with International Women’s Day (March 8th), observed worldwide since 1914. Within a few years, many schools and communities were celebrating National Women’s History Week, supported by resolutions from school boards, city councils, governors, and the U.S. Congress. In 1987, Congress passed a law designating the first Women’s History Month. Today, Women’s History Month is the occasion for events and observances across the country to honor the significant achievements of women throughout history.

    free resource button small  March is Women’s History MonthWomen in the United States struggled for more than a century to obtain the right to vote. In 1920, the suffrage movement finally achieved victory with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution. A biography of social activist, abolitionist, and women’s suffrage pioneer, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, is provided in this selection from Defining Moments: Women’s Suffrage.

    Additional information about the events leading up to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, along with biographies of other key figures and related primary source documents, can be found in Defining Moments: Women’s Suffrage.

    Posted: March 1, 2019

  • February Is American Heart Month

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Families, health professionals, and communities can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices. February is American Heart Month, sponsored by the American Heart Association. They recommend healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease, or to control and prevent risk factors if you already have heart disease. To lower your risk:

    Watch your weight.
    Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
    Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
    If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
    Get active and eat healthy.

    free resource button small  February Is American Heart MonthThis selection from Cardiovascular Disorders Sourcebook provides information on two related topics: Preventing Heart Disease at Any Age and Heart Healthy Eating.

    Comprehensive information about the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the heart and blood vessels is available in Cardiovascular Disorders Sourcebook, 6th Edition.

    Posted: February 4, 2019

  • February Is African American History Month

    African American History Month, celebrated annually in February, is an opportunity to recognize the contributions of African Americans to our nation’s history and culture. The origin of the observance can be traced to 1926, when historian Carter G. Woodson and his organization, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, announced the first Negro History Week. In subsequent years, the response to the effort built until 50 years later, in 1976, the first month-long celebration of African American history was held. Today, African American History Month is the occasion for events and observances across the country to honor the achievements of African Americans and to recognize their central role in U.S. history.

    free resource button small  February Is African American History MonthIn addition to African American History Month, there are a host of celebrations around the country that are dedicated to black history and culture. This selection from African-American Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations includes two guides to these events: a calendar of holidays, festivals, and celebrations and an alphabetical listing, with contact information, of organizations that sponsor the events.

    Additional information about African American History Month and many other events that celebrate black history and culture can be found in African-American Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations, 2nd Ed.

    Posted: February 4, 2019

  • January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month

    Birth defects affect 1 in every 33 babies born in the United States and are a leading cause of infant mortality, illness, and disability. Though diagnosis and treatment of these conditions has improved dramatically, the focus of public health efforts is to reduce the number of birth defects that occur. National Birth Defects Prevention Month is intended to raise awareness about the prevention of birth defects and to educate the public about concrete steps a woman can take before and during pregnancy to increase her chances of having a healthy baby.

    free resource button small  January is National Birth Defects Prevention MonthThis directory of resources, from Congenital Disorders Sourcebook, 4th Edition, provides information on organizations that provide information, support, and advocacy for families affected by birth defects.

    Comprehensive information about the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of birth defects is available in Congenital Disorders Sourcebook, 4th Edition.

    Posted: December 31, 2018

  • The Opening of Ellis Island

    The federal immigration station on Ellis Island, a modest spit of land in New York Harbor, a short distance from the Statue of Liberty, was opened on January 1, 1892. In the first thirty-two years after Ellis Island opened its doors, the facility processed about twelve million men, women, and children—about 75 percent of all immigrants who entered the United States during that time. For millions of Americans, Ellis Island became the symbol of the entire immigration experience. Today it is estimated that over 100 million Americans can trace their ancestry to the immigrants who first passed through the Port of New York at Ellis Island.

    free resource button small  The Opening of Ellis IslandThis chapter from Defining Moments: The Dream of America—Immigration 1870-1920 discusses events leading up to and following the opening of Ellis Island, and it’s role in the American immigrant experience.

    Additional information about the greatest sustained wave of immigration in U.S. history, plus biographies of the key players and related primary source documents, can be found in Defining Moments: The Dream of America—Immigration 1870-1920.

    Posted: December 28, 2018

  • October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

    A woman born in the United States today has a 1 in 8 chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer at some point during her life. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month focuses attention on the disease and is chance to raise awareness about the importance of screening and the early detection.

    free resource button small  October Is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthThis directory of resources from Breast Cancer Sourcebook provides information on organizations that provide information, support, and advocacy for people with breast cancer.

    Comprehensive information about the risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer is available in Breast Cancer Sourcebook, 5th Edition.

    Posted: October 1, 2018

  • September Is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

    Prostate cancer starts in the prostate, a small gland in the male reproductive system. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in men, after skin cancer. But this cancer can be treated successfully, and nearly 100% of men diagnosed today will still be alive in five years. Early detection and treatment can save lives, so routine testing is important.

    free resource button small  September Is Prostate Cancer Awareness MonthThis chapter from Cancer Sourcebook provides a wealth of information on prostate cancer, including a description of the disease, its symptoms, diagnostic tests, stages, treatment, and more.

    Comprehensive information about the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of many different types of cancer is available in Cancer Sourcebook, 8th Edition.

    Posted: September 7, 2018

  • Labor Day

    Celebrated on the first Monday in September, Labor Day honors the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of the nation; it also celebrates the accomplishments of the labor movement in achieving increased wages and legal protections for workers. Labor Day has been a national holiday in the United States since 1894.

    free resource button small  Labor DayThe path leading up to the creation of the holiday included great hardship for many workers. Information about labor conditions for workers and the development of the labor movement in the latter part of the 19th century is included in this chapter from Defining Moments: Workers Unite! The American Labor Movement.

    Additional information about the history of the American labor movement, plus biographies of the key players and primary source documents, can be found in Defining Moments: Workers Unite! The American Labor Movement.

    Posted: August 27, 2018

  • September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

    National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month calls attention to the dangerously high rates of obesity in American youth. The program’s goal is to build awareness about childhood obesity and encourage action. 1 in 5 children in the United States are overweight or obese. Childhood obesity puts kids at risk for health problems that were once seen only in adults, like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

    free resource button small  September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness MonthThis selection from Diet Information for Teens, 4th Edition, provides information on weight-loss and nutrition myths.

    Comprehensive information on nutrition, vitamins and minerals, the elements of food, smart eating plans, weight-related concerns, and a range of health conditions related to diet is available in Diet Information for Teens, 4th Edition.

    Posted: August 27, 2018

  • The Hiroshima Peace Ceremony

    In July 1945, World War II was nearing an end but fighting continued between the United States and Japan. On August 6, 1945, following Japan’s refusal to accede to its surrender order, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Nagasaki, Japan. In Hiroshima approximately 80,000 people were killed immediately, along with 40,000 in Nagasaki. Many tens of thousands more people would die in the following months and years from radiation sickness and cancer. The two bombings remain the only time nuclear weapons have been used in warfare. Since 1947, the city of Hiroshima has held an annual Peace Ceremony on August 6th to commemorate the bombing and mourn the victims.

    free resource button small  The Hiroshima Peace CeremonyInformation about the customs and traditions associated with the Hiroshima Peace Ceremony is available in this entry from Holiday Symbols and Customs, 5th Edition.

    Holiday Symbols and Customs, 5th Edition covers a diverse selection of more than 350 holidays and festivals from the United States and around the world, with information on more than 1,200 symbols and customs associated with these special events.

    Posted: August 6, 2018