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Featured Books

    • original

      teen health series

      Drug Information for Teens, 5th Ed.

      By: Angela L. Williams
      Library binding. 464 pages. Aug 2018.
      978-0-7808-1638-1.

      Provides consumer health information for teens about drug use, abuse, and addiction, including facts about illegal drugs and the abuse of legally available substances found in over-the-counter medications; describes drug-related health risks and treatment for addiction. Includes index, resource information and online access.

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      Web Price: $62.00

    • original

      health reference series

      AIDS Sourcebook, 7th Ed.

      By: Angela L. Williams
      Library binding. 600 pages. Aug 2018.
      978-0-7808-1636-7.

      Provides consumer health information about transmission, testing, stages, and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with facts about prevention, related complications, and tips for living with HIV/AIDS.  Includes index, glossary of related terms, directory of resources and online access.

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      Web Price: $85.00

    • original

      health reference series

      Stress-Related Disorders Sourcebook, 5th Ed.

      By: Angela L. Williams
      Library binding. 600 pages. Aug 2018.
      978-0-7808-1634-3.

      Provides consumer health information about types of stress and the stress response, the physical and mental health effects of stress, along with facts about treatment for stress-related disorders, and stress management techniques for adults and children. Includes index, glossary of related terms, online access and other resources.

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      Web Price: $85.00

    • original

      health reference series

      Cancer Sourcebook For Women, 6th Ed.

      By: Angela Williams
      Library binding. 600 pages. July 2018.
      978-0-7808-1630-5.

      Consumer health information about risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancers of concern to women. Includes index, glossary of related terms, online access and other resources.

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      Web Price: $85.00

Free Resources

  • The Hiroshima Peace Ceremony

    In July 1945, World War II was nearing an end but fighting continued between the United States and Japan. On August 6, 1945, following Japan’s refusal to accede to its surrender order, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Nagasaki, Japan. In Hiroshima approximately 80,000 people were killed immediately, along with 40,000 in Nagasaki. Many tens of thousands more people would die in the following months and years from radiation sickness and cancer. The two bombings remain the only time nuclear weapons have been used in warfare. Since 1947, the city of Hiroshima has held an annual Peace Ceremony on August 6th to commemorate the bombing and mourn the victims.

    free resource button small  The Hiroshima Peace CeremonyInformation about the customs and traditions associated with the Hiroshima Peace Ceremony is available in this entry from Holiday Symbols and Customs, 5th Edition.

    Holiday Symbols and Customs, 5th Edition covers a diverse selection of more than 350 holidays and festivals from the United States and around the world, with information on more than 1,200 symbols and customs associated with these special events.

    Posted: August 6, 2018

  • Passage of the 14th Amendment

    At the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction, Congress crafted three amendments to the U.S. Constitution that gave essential civil rights to African Americans. The 13th Amendment, passed in 1865, abolished slavery throughout the United States. The 14th Amendment, which became law on July 9, 1868, guaranteed the rights of full citizenship to all Americans, regardless of race; it also guaranteed all U.S. citizens equal protection under the law and prohibited anyone from taking away a citizen’s rights without due process. The 15th Amendment, passed in 1870, guaranteed the right to vote regardless of race.

    free resource button small  Passage of the 14th AmendmentThis chapter from Defining Moments: The Voting Rights Act of 1965 describes some of the history of securing voting rights for African Americans.

    Additional information about the events before and after the passage of the Voting Rights Act, including biographies of the key players and related primary source documents, can be found in Defining Moments: The Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    Posted: July 2, 2018