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Featured Resources

    • original

      health reference series

      PTSD and Coping with Trauma Sourcebook, 1st Ed

      By: Angela L. Williams
      Library binding. 544 pages. Nov 2019.
      978-0-7808-1767-8.

      Consumer health information about posttraumatic disorder, covering topics such as types of trauma, diagnosis and treatment and living with PTSD. Includes index, glossary of related terms, and other resources.

      More Details

      Web Price: $85.00

    • original

      health reference series

      Depression Sourcebook, 5th Ed.

      By: Angela L. Williams
      Library binding. 600 pages. Nov 2019.
      978-0-7808-1735-7.

      Consumer health information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of various forms of depression, along with coping tips and strategies for building resilience and self-esteem.  Includes index, glossary of related terms, and other resources.

      More Details

      Web Price: $85.00

Free Resources

  • January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. All women are at risk for cervical cancer, but it most often occurs in women over the age of 30. Each year, about 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer and in 2019, the American Cancer Society predicted that 4,250 women would die from cervical cancer.

    But what causes cervical cancer?

    Human papillomavirus, more commonly referred to as HPV, is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus that is passed from one person to another during sex. At least half of sexually active people will have HPV at some point in their lives. Thankfully, cervical cancer is highly preventable in most Western countries because of screening tests and the HPV vaccine.

    Cervical cancer is a highly treatable cancer when detected early. This January, we will be focusing on cervical cancer signs, treatment, awareness, and things that you can do to protect yourself and your family.

    Posted: January 3, 2020

  • World AIDS Day— December 1st

    In the United States, almost 40,000 people get HIV every year. Many people infected with HIV don’t know they have it. This devastating disease attacks the immune system and affects all parts of the body, eventually leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), it’s most deadly and advanced stage, for which there is currently no cure. Yet there is hope for the many Americans living with HIV infection or AIDS. Researchers are developing new and more effective drug combinations, and scientists are growing ever closer to a vaccine. Improvements in medication and earlier diagnosis mean that those infected with HIV are living longer, healthier, and more productive lives.

    Established by the World Health Organization in 1988 and observed each year on December 1st, World AIDS Day is an opportunity for organizations around the world to raise awareness and advocate for progress in HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care.

    free resource button small  World AIDS Day— December 1stThis chapter offering advice for coping with an HIV/AIDS diagnosis is from AIDS Sourcebook.

    Comprehensive information about risk factors, prevention, transmission, and treatment of HIV and related complications, along with tips for living with HIV/AIDS, is available in AIDS Sourcebook, 7th Edition.

    Posted: December 1, 2019